Deep Heart

This first offering is an abridgment of a 3 volume set of books called The Lam Rim.  These texts were written by the lineage founder of the Dalai Lama.  They contain beautiful instructions on the path of equanimity.  There is beautiful information on differentiating wholesome and unwholesome behaviors and how to maintain an open heart.  These texts were written by Tsonghapa in 14th century Tibet.  I will post my abridgment in 4 postings.

TEACHINGS ON THE GREAT TREATISETEACHINGS ON THE GREAT TREATISE
His Holiness the Dalai Lama
July 10-15, 2008
Notes taken by Michael J. Shea, Ph.D.
Text and audio files of full presentation available on www.lamrim.com

Day 1

Infinite altruism is the Buddhist path.

The teaching on Dependent Origination lays the groundwork for the most important teaching in Buddhism, which is the sustained awareness of the Wisdom of Emptiness.

In order to achieve the Wisdom of Emptiness, one must stop grasping at the belief of the intrinsic nature of the self or a permanent “I.” Then one must stop grasping all views of reality other than this.

His Holiness spoke of the three types of practitioners. The first type of practitioner is one who wishes for a better rebirth into a higher realm. The second type of practitioner seeks a fortunate rebirth by cultivating the conviction in the law of karma. The third type of practitioner seeks Definite Goodness. This is the cultivation of ultimate reality or the Wisdom of Emptiness.

Click to read entire article   01-TEACHINGS ON THE GREAT TREATISE HHDL 2008 (2)

The Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment (Lam Rim Han Mo)
By Tsong-Kha-Pa
Vol. 2, pp. 298-301

How the afflictions arise

Karma and the afflictions are both necessary as causes for the creation of cyclic existence, but the afflictions are primary. For, just as a seed without moisture, soil, etc. will not produce a sprout, so in the absence of afflictions – even though you have accumulated immeasurable karma in the past – there will be no sprout of suffering because the karma lacks the necessary cooperating conditions. A further reason afflictions are primary is because – even without previously accumulated karma – if afflictions are present, you immediately accumulate new karma, and will thereby appropriate aggregates in the future.

Click to read entire article  02-The Great Treatise Vol 2 Mental Afflictions

 

The Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment (Lam Rim Han Mo)
By Tsong-Kha-PA
Vol. 2, pp. 202-203

As to how you are to act when you joyously persevere at eliminating what is to be eliminated, Engaging in the Bodhisattva Deeds states:As to how you are to act when you joyously persevere at eliminating what is to be eliminated, Engaging in the Bodhisattva Deeds states:
As a seasoned warrior approaches A sword-fight with an enemy,  I shall parry the blows of the afflictions And strongly strike the afflictions, my enemies.
For example, when seasoned warriors – the adepts who are accustomed to the activity of fighting battles – enter into a sword fight, etc., with their enemy, they do not put value only on destroying their opponent. Rather, they must accomplish two things – skillfully avoiding the blows of weapons directed at them and destroying their opponent. Likewise, when practitioners battle their afflictions, they must persevere as they become proficient in two things – taking defensive precautions and thus avoiding a wound to their mine, and, on the offensive, destroying the afflictions by applying their remedies. For, otherwise, while they may use the remedy to stop the activity of one portion of the afflictions, or else they develop a great fault in their mind so that the harm of the afflictions and the creation of virtue are equal, in which case it will be hard to make further progress in the virtuous practice of applying the remedy.

Click to read entire article  03-The Great Treatise Vol 2 Mindfulness Wisdom

 

The Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment (Lam Rim Han Mo)
By Tsong-Kha-PA
Vol. 3, pp. 48-50

 

Now I shall explain how to develop concentration in a manner conducive to achieving serenity.

Here, concentration refers to your attention remaining one-pointedly on an object of meditation; in addition it must stay with the object continuously. Two things are needed for this: (1) a technique in which your attention is not distracted from whatever it had as its original object of meditation, and (2) an accurate awareness of whether you are distracted and whether you are becoming distracted. The former is mindfulness; the latter is vigilance. Vasubandhu’s Commentary on the “Ornament for the Mahāyāna Sutras” (Mahāyāna-sutrālamkāra-bhāsya) states:

Mindfulness and vigilance bring about close mental focus because the former prevents your attention from wandering from the object of meditation and the latter clearly recognizes that your attention is wandering.

 

Click to read entire article  04-The Great Treatise Vol 3 Mindfulness